color theory through floral design

Your wedding color palette is one of the first decisions you’ll make and it plays a role in pretty much everything regarding your wedding design after that, from the venue to your bridesmaid dresses and of course, the flowers.

The spring issue of Martha Stewart Weddings contains a wonderful feature titled In Living Color that shows how to use different color palettes in floral design – from monochromatic schemes to multihued ones!

Colorful bridal bouquet from Martha Stewart Weddings | see more on:  http://burnettsboards.com/2014/03/color-theory-floral-design/

TOTALLY TECHNICOLOR

For a multihued wedding color palette the key is to have a base and add in a rainbow’s worth of other colors after that. The largest flowers in the bouquet above (the ranunculus and peonies) serve as the base and pops of color in the form of tangerines, berries, irises, and vines bring in the technicolor effect without getting out of control.

Green, blue, and purple bridal #bouquet from Martha Stewart Weddings | see more on: http://burnettsboards.com/2014/03/color-theory-floral-design/

COMPLEMENTARY CHIC

Using the color wheel to create this palette of hues between light green and dark purple, this exquisite bouquet has a more traditional round shape and loads of awesome textures. Be sure to check out its corresponding centerpiece in Martha Stewart Weddings!

Lavender and peach centerpieces from Martha Stewart Weddings | see more on:  http://burnettsboards.com/2014/03/color-theory-floral-design/

CONTRASTING SHADES

Revisiting art class color theory in order to come up your wedding day color palette is always a good idea. Secondary, opposite colors will give you a gorgeously natural color scheme that is easy on the eyes – like the centerpieces above in shades of lavender, purple, and peach.

Yellow bridal bouquet from Martha Stewart Weddings | see more on: http://burnettsboards.com/2014/03/color-theory-floral-design/

SINGULAR SENSATION

Monochromatic weddings have always been my favorites since they tend to look more sophisticated. The key with working in one color is to vary the hues, shades, and textures to create a multidimensional effect like in this all yellow bridal bouquet.

Martha Stewart Weddings Spring 2014 issue

To see more from this feature be sure to head to the nearest newsstand and grab a copy of Martha Stewart Weddings or download it onto your iPad!

More articles on color theory & floral design:

How to create color palettes
Are your color choices sending the right message?
Bridal bouquet styles
Designing the perfect centerpiece

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Images photographed by Ngoc Minh Ngo & provided by Martha Stewart Weddings, styled by Melissa Colgan with floral design by Matthew Robbins.

About Sara Burnett

Editor of Burnett's Boards, which she founded to showcase global creativity in the wedding industry. Sara currently lives out of a suitcase while island hopping the Caribbean and beyond. Learn More // Follow on Instagram.

Comments

  1. I love multihued palettes, but the monochromatic look can be so beautiful, as that yellow bouquet attests. I definitely need to pick up a copy of the latest issue of MSW!

  2. You bring such a fresh and clever perspective to wedding style and design. This is one of my favorite blogs because of that!

  3. Yup, I’m a sucker for the complementary and contrasting palettes – this confirmed that! Although that technicolor bouquet is making me question that…

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